Moneta II: (Re)covering a botched hem

Taken at the Botanical Gardens, just before we left Dublin

Taken at the Botanical Gardens, just before we left Dublin

I had all kinds of trouble attaching clear elastic to the waistline of my first Moneta. I got some great tips in response to my plea for assistance on tackling clear elastic and recently decided that enough time had elapsed for me to give it another go. I bought this bamboo jersey at Hickey’s in Dublin when I spotted it on sale several weeks ago, and managed to finish up the Moneta before we left for Shanghai. The jersey is quite thin and has a strong tendency to roll up at the edges – which contributed to things going a bit crazy at the hemline…

Moneta 2 bk Ladystitcher

I used a twin needle around the sleeve cuffs and neckline before working on the hem, so luckily those were already finished before disaster struck: the needles kept chewing up the hem and sucking it into the needle plate. I think this was down to a combination of bad fabric management on my part and having the tension a touch off (though it had seemed ok on the neckline!). Then, when I was trying to straighten things out, I hit a pin and shattered the twin needle. Whoops…

So, I managed to make a complete mess of the hem – it was really puckered and the back of the stitching was all kinds of odd. I didn’t want to cut the fabric and lose the length though, so instead I scouted out some lovely stretch lace from a haberdashery in the Powerscourt Centre, A Rubanesque. She didn’t have enough of the lace I’d picked out left in stock, so instead she suggested cutting this really wide one in half, which worked perfectly for making a nice wide band of lace.

Cutting Lace Ladystitcher

I hand stitched the lace on to make sure I moulded it around the skirt without puckering and so that it covered the hem evenly along the bottom. Here’s a closer photo of the lace being stitched on – and the ‘right’ side of the hem pre-lace:

20141002-152333-55413345.jpg

Ooof…

It feels like cheating a bit to basically put a band aid over what is a truly disastrous hem, but I quite like how it turned out! I’m not sure how I could have rescued it otherwise, without cutting up the skirt and re-doing the hem with a new twin needle. As it is, I really like this dress and have already worn it several times. The bamboo jersey is a lovely bright blue and is really, really soft, and the lace adds something a little delicate to what would have been a very simple dress.

Have you ever done an emergency patch-up or patch-over on a sewing project? How did it turn out?

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22 thoughts on “Moneta II: (Re)covering a botched hem

  1. It looks so intentional and great! I cut a hole in a waistband while trimming seams which led to belt loops stuck on top, haha! I’m still waiting to get a belt though, oops!
    Beautiful dress and love the styling! πŸ™‚

  2. Great idea to hide an unruly hem. A truly genius way of adding a little bit of creative detailing to the fabulous Moneta.
    Such a gorgeous colour on you too. I hope you have settled into your new home. Looking forward to some exciting posts about your new adventures.

    • Thanks Caroline, still settling in but finding all kinds of interesting places! I’m going to finally have a stab at making trousers using New Look 6246 – I really need a lightweight pair for this warm weather and to hide from mosquitos!

    • Good so far though having some Mandarin will really help! Am starting lessons soon and we’re going to get a tutor for practice. The city is fascinating – you’ll have to put it on your list for your next Asian adventure πŸ™‚

  3. That w a a great save. It looks super professional. The fabric looks lovely and cosy. And the colour is fantastic I’d nearly go up to Dublin to get some of I thought there was any left. This is one of the nicest monetas I’ve seen online.

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